RESOURCES

Biodiversity Means Business

Businesses rely heavily on ecosystem services as critical inputs into their production processes. At the same time, business and industry can have major negative impacts on biodiversity resources. However, the resources and influence of the private sector offer important opportunities for innovative and effective contributions to conservation.

Biodiversity Means Business

The focus of this project is based on the large (550ha) rurally located Wrexham Industrial Estate and its surrounding rural communities. Through a collaborative approach involving businesses, landowners, farmers and community groups the aim is to improve the resilience of the ecosystems across the landscape while making the area positively attractive to businesses and providing easily accessible areas for people to enjoy a range of leisure activities and engaging with their local environment.

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The Relationship of Business to Biodiversity

Biodiversity is a fundamental component of long-term business survival. Businesses rely on genes, species, and ecosystem services as critical inputs into their production processes and depend on healthy ecosystems to treat and dissipate waste, maintain soil and water quality and help control the air composition. For example, agribusiness relies on the diversity of wild relatives of major food crops, as a resource to ensure crop resistance to disease and pests.

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How Does Business Impact on Biodiversity?

All companies can have an impact on biodiversity in the course of their business - because they use natural resources, produce or consume products, own and manage areas of land, or finance other activities which have direct and indirect impacts.

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Biodiversity and Business: 4 things you need to know for 2020

This year, 2020, has been dubbed the "super year" for the environment. We’re used to hearing about climate change and the urgent need to slow global warming. While business and biodiversity might seem strange bedfellows, companies are dependent on biodiversity. And while the level of dependency can vary across sectors, the loss of biodiversity is a critical risk for all.

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Biodiversity-related risks to Businesses

The broad systemic implications of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation are linked to resource management, climate change and population growth. We should remember that where there are risks there are also opportunities; with new trading mechanisms and markets, new technologies and design approaches, and improved land-use models, a new green economy presents a myriad of new areas for businesses to create value.

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Business and Biodiversity – Chances and Risks for individual Industries

Besides climate change the loss of biodiversity is seen as the second greatest danger for the world's human population. Almost all businesses rely in any kind of way on resources, provided by nature. These resources are based on an intact functioning system of biodiversity. The loss of natural species therefore directly endangers the resources of all businesses.

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The Business Case 10 for Biodiversity

Increasingly, companies are recognising that incorporating environmental and social concerns into business plans and processes is essential for lasting commercial success. There is a growing recognition, too, of the need for environmental and social responsibility. With respect to ‘brown’ issues such as pollution and waste, many companies are making significant progress. It is on ‘green’ issues, however, such as ecosystem management and sustainable use of biological resources, that the responsibilities and indeed the risks and opportunities for businesses, are less well understood. This Handbook introduces the concept of ‘biodiversity’ and explains why and how businesses should address biodiversity. The term ‘businesses’ represents a large variety of actors. It covers such diverse sectors as the extractive industries (mining, oil and gas); the banking and financial sector; biodiversity-based companies such as agriculture, fisheries, forestry and water; tourism; energy; manufacturing to name but a few. Businesses also operate at very different scales: from small artisanal operations, to small and medium-sized companies and global multinationals. The needs of these companies will be very different. Whilst providing a generic vision and framework of business and biodiversity issues, the Handbook recognises this diversity and the need, in the end, to target individualised biodiversity activities.

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